Action Alerts

Tell Senator Jeff Flake that you want WOLVES WITHOUT BOUNDARIES!

The Grand Canyon region in northern Arizona and southern Utah has been identified by science as necessary for Mexican wolf recovery. Science also shows that wolves are important for restoring the ecological health of our wildlands.

 But current reintroduction rules do not allow Mexican gray wolves to live north of I-40.

 Please call U.S. Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ) and tell him that you support efforts to restore and protect wolves in the Grand Canyon region today. You can personalize and use some of the talking points below in your message.

Dear Senator Flake,

- As a resident of Arizona, I want wolves fully restored in my state, including in the Grand Canyon region north of I-40.
- I am with the 81% of Arizona voters who support the return of the Mexican wolf to the Grand Canyon region.
- Please use your role to ensure the best available science (not special interests) is used in Mexican wolf recovery planning.
- The rules that keep Mexican gray wolves from living north of I-40 contradict the best available science on recovery and cheat us of the ecological benefits of restoring wolves in this important region.
- Wolves have been missing from most of Arizona for too long. Please do everything necessary to restore them to the essential natural role throughout the Southwest.

You can call him with this message:
Phoenix Office: (602) 840-1891
Tucson Office: (520) 575-8633
Washington, D.C. Office: (202) 224-4521

Thank you for speaking out for wolves today!

Opportunity to Comment on the 2017 Wolf Release Proposal

Comment on the Mexican wolf 2017 release plan before the Deadline of March 8, 2017 11:59 Mountain Time

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service should release more than two families of wolves into the wild in 2017 rather than rely too heavily on the risky and less proven cross-fostering technique.
We'd also like to see them release wolves into approved, suitable release sites beyond the Gila and Aldo Leopold Wilderness areas.
Fourteen wolves were lost from the wild in 2016. For every wild lobo lost, we would like to see the Service release the same number of captive wolves to the wild. These should be released as bonded families.

Send your comments to:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

or

Mexican Wolf Recovery Program
Attn: proposed releases in NM
2105 Osuna Rd. NE
Albuquerque, NM 87113

You can read the Release and Translocation Plan HERE.

mexican wolf stock 22 by Amber Legras

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Additional Talking Points

• The release plan cannot succeed if New Mexico and Arizona continue to block the release of families of wolves. Cross-fostering is a risky method that should be used to supplement the release of packs, not replace it. Of the six pups who were cross-fostered in 2016, only three are known to be alive.

• The current release plan allows for up to ten cross-fostered pups, but the process is risky and very hard to achieve. There's no guarantee that ten pups will be born at the right time for a cross-foster match to occur.

• The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to see an ongoing Mexican wolf growth rate of 10% annually. This year's 16% increase in the wild population is good news, but it follows a year with a 12% decrease, and the big increase this year is due to a large number of pups who have survived. There are still only six breeding pairs in the wild--not nearly enough to overcome the inbreeding the wild population is experiencing.

• The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must let the best available science guide the Mexican wolf recovery process, not individual state politics.

• A majority of voters in New Mexico want to the recovery program to succeed. Governor Martinez would gain more support from voters by working with the recovery program, rather than against it. In a 2013 poll of registered voters, 87% of both Arizonans and New Mexicans agreed that “wolves are a vital part of America’s wilderness and natural heritage.” 83% of Arizonans and 80% of New Mexicans agreed that “the US Fish and Wildlife Service should make every effort to help wolves recover and prevent extinction.”

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